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NINE BUCK OWENS & THE BUCKEROOS ALBUMSSPANNING 1968-1974 TO BE REISSUED


Throughout Omnivore Recordings' 12-year relationship with the Buck Owens Private Foundation, one request from the fans was clear and consistent — to make Buck Owens' late-'60s/early-'70s releases available again as stand-alone reissues.

Omnivore is pleased to answer that call and announce nine titles to be released throughout the summer and fall of 2021. The albums will be released as they were originally issued and for the first time, appear in their original configuration on CD and Digital (in both standard and high resolution), mastered from the original analog tapes, and with expanded artwork and new liner notes. Street dates, shown below for each title, are August 8, August 27 and October 1, 2021.

Buck Owens and the Buckaroos had 21 #1 hits on Billboard while pioneering the world-famous Bakersfield country sound — although he preferred to call it simply "American music." The sound was distinguished in part by the twangy guitar work of Don Rich and drum tracks placed forward in the mix. Other key Bakersfield stars included Merle Haggard, Jean Shepard, Susan Raye and Freddie Hart. And later, Kentucky-born Dwight Yoakam would base his own sound on the city's forebears. Owens is in both the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. He co-hosted the Hee Haw TV music and comedy hour with Roy Clark from 1966-86. And he owned the Bakersfield music venue Crystal Palace, which remains the home of the Bakersfield sound to this day, as well as several radio stations in the Bakersfield market.

Available August 6:

Sweet Rosie Jones

This was Buck and His Buckaroos third(!) album of 1968; ten of the 12 songs were written or co-written by Owens, including the title track, which hit #2 on the country singles charts. The only songs that didn't bear his name as a writer were "Swingin' Doors" from former Buckaroo Merle Haggard and then-current Buckaroo Tommy Collins' "The Girl on Sugar Pie Lane." With classics like "You'll Never Miss the Water (Till the Well Runs Dry)" and "Happy Times Are Here Again," the original album holds a special place in the Buckaroos' run, reaching #2 on the country album charts.

I've Got You on My Mind Again

This 1968 release features 11 of the 12 songs written entirely by Owens, including the title track, which hit #5 on the country singles charts. There are two duets with Buck's son Buddy Alan, one the #7 hit "Let the World Keep on a Turnin'." The original album hit the Top 20 on the country album charts.

Tall Dark Stranger

When originally released in September of 1969, Tall Dark Stranger shot to #2 on the country album charts, fueled by the success of the title cut, which reached #1 on the singles charts. Owens wrote ten of the 11 songs, including "White Satin Bed," co-written with Gene Price, and "In the Middle of a Teardrop," co-written with Buckaroos Don Rich and Doyle Holly.

Available August 27:

Your Mother's Prayer

Originally released in early 1970, Your Mother's Prayer saw Buck and His Buckaroos returning to a musical genre they always loved — gospel. Ten of the 11 songs were written, co-written or arranged by Owens. The release has become one of Buck's most coveted albums.

The Kansas City Song

Another 1970 release, The Kansas City Song gave Owens an additional Top 10 entry on the country album charts. All of the songs were written or co-written by Owens, including the title track, which hit #2 on the country singles charts. It also began Buck's run of "city centered" material, which would come to fruition later that year on the hit release I Wouldn't Live in New York City.

I Wouldn't Live in New York City

This 1970 effort reached #12 on the country album charts. All ten of the songs were written or co-written by Owens, including "I Wouldn't Live in New York City (If They Gave Me the Whole Dang Town)," which hit #9 on the country singles charts, and gave Buck his 38th Top 10 hit of the decade. The album also introduces the newest and youngest Buckaroo, Jim Shaw on electric organ, harmonica, and piano.

Available October 1:

In the Palm of Your Hand

Originally released in 1973, In the Palm of Your Hand became yet another hit album, making a #21 entry on the country album charts. Nine of the ten of the songs were written or co-written by Owens, with the other being penned by his son, Buddy Alan. The title track would land at #23 on the singles chart, and "Arms Full of Empty" would became a #14 hit.

Ain't It Amazing, Gracie

Out just two months after In the Palm of Your Hand, Ain't It Amazing, Gracie reached #17 on the country album charts. The title track would peak at #14 on the singles chart, and the album included what would become a Buck Owens staple, the Homer Joy-penned"Streets of Bakersfield," which would top the charts in 1988 in as duet with Dwight Yoakam.

(It's a) Monster's Holiday

This 1974 release was the group's 23rd Top 10 country album. It features "On the Cover of the Music City News," a re-write of Shel Silverstein's "Cover of the Rolling Stone," adapted by Owens and Jim Shaw. The title track would peak at #6 on the singles chart.

Now these classic albums return — mastered from the original analog tapes by Grammy®-winner Michael Graves, produced for release by Grammy®-winner Cheryl Pawelski, and featuring expanded artwork including new liner notes from author Randy Poe (Buck 'Em! The Autobiography of Buck Owens).